Web
Analytics Made Easy - StatCounter

Geospect, LLC

State-Of-The-Art Mudlogging Equipment

Geospect Blog

List of Articles

Defining a Unit of Gas in Mud Logging

2018-10-19 16:42:06

Geospect Defining a Unit of Gas in Mud Logging
Geospect Defining a Unit of Gas in Mud Logging
Most old mud loggers will tell you that there is no official definition of a unit of gas. If that is the case then why do mud loggers, geologists, and other oilfield personnel talk about gas in units. The reason is that units of gas are indeed defined in the oilfield. They are defined by tradition, by mud logging companies, and by oil and gas exploration companies. In my experience, only two standards for calibrating mud logging gas detectors exist in the United States. Both of these standards define gas units that are equal to a known concentration of methane in air. The first standard is: one percent methane in air (or nitrogen) is equal to 50 units of gas. The second standard is: one percent methane in air (or nitrogen) is equal to 100 units of gas. I would also put forward that the 100 unit standard is by far the most common. Also, in my experience, the determination on whether to use the  50 unit or 100 unit standard is almost always determined by one of three factors; geography, preference of the oil company drilling a well, or the preference of the mud logging company contracted to handle the mud logging service for a particular well.  Geography is a big one because in my experience the 50 unit standard is almost exclusively used either off shore in the Gulf of Mexico, or in South Texas. The 100 unit standard is used almost everywhere else, at least in the United States. If the oil company has a preference it is almost always the 100 unit standard. This is because most oil companies prefer higher gas readings to lower gas readings when given the choice. Mud logging companies usually have their own preferences, but most will defer to oil companies on the matter. I would also add that whether the 50 unit or 100 unit standard is used, the gas curve will look exactly the same on a linear scaled gas column on a mud log and only slightly different on a logarithmic scaled mud log. The differences on the logarithmic scaled mud log will be more pronounced with lower gas readings.  All of that being said there is still no official definition of a unit of gas; at least not one that I am aware of.



Mudlogging vs Mud Logging

2018-10-18 04:33:46

Geospect mudlogging vs mud logging
Geospect mudlogging vs mud logging
Recently, I was brushing up on search engine optimization for the Geospect website and noticed that some search engines still have different results for the terms "mudlogging" and "mud logging." Thank God Google recognized these two terms as being one in the same many years ago, however, some search engines treat the two terms as different terms.

They Mean Exactly The Same Thing

"Mudlogging" and "Mud Logging" both mean exactly the same thing, so why don't the search engines do something about fixing it. I assume they have either not been made aware of the issue or that they do not have the resources to follow up on it. They could probably care less. It is more than likely a combination of all three. It also seems that if the various search engines fixed "mudlogging" and "mud logging" that they would also have to worry about fixing the various other forms of the word such as "mud logger / mudlogger" and "mud log / mudlog."  I know this seems like a petty issue, but when SEO is involved one must account for the different ways to write the same keywords. Perhaps they should group new terminology in as well. The term "Surface Logging" comes to mind. In fifty years maybe someone could write an article about "surface logging" vs "surfacelogging."

Well there's my rant for tonight.



Rig Geolograph

2018-10-14 18:54:08

Geospect Rig Geolograph
Geospect Rig Geolograph
A geolograph is a device that measures depth and that if installed is usually found in the doghouse. It was once commonplace for a drilling rig to have a geolograph while on location drilling an oil or gas well. Mudloggers would connect a micro-switch, donut, or similar device to the rig geolograph in order to get a depth signal for their mudlogging instruments.

Draw Works Sensor

Now days it is more common for the rig to get its depth from a computer system hooked to an optical encoder that is mounted onto the drilling rigs draw works. If the mudlogging company has the technology to connect to the rig computer, mudloggers can simple get a WITS connection from the EDR company and receive their depth digitally. This presents a problem if the mudlogging company doesn't have WITS technology. If that be the case, what is the mudlogging company to do?

Purchase a Geospect Mudlogging System

One solution would be to purchase a Geospect mudlogging system. Geospect is a complete mudlogging system in a box. This is the ideal solution since it comes with the ability to connect to either WITS or the older "pulse" systems. Geospect is quite affordable but it might still be out of reach for a brand new or fledgling mudlogging company. What if the new mudlogging company has already purchased some older instruments that can't communicate with the rig computer via WITS?

Get A Geospect Data Acquisition System

Geospect makes a DAQ system that hooks up to most third party instruments. It can also communicate with rig computers for a fraction of the cost of renting equipment or purchasing new equipment.

For more information visit the Geospect Product Page.




Dual Sensor Gas Analyzer

2018-10-11 02:24:33

Geospect Dual Sensor Gas Analyzer
The Geospect Dual Sensor Gas Analyzer

The Dual Sensor Gas Analyzer ( The low cost, high speed oil detector)

New Mudlogging Technology Finds More Oil While Drilling

This is the story about how we came up with a low cost high speed oil detector. The Dual Sensor Gas Analyzer by Geospect.

 Early Mud Logging Gas Analysis

Mud logger's are the folks that do the work of trying to find oil and gas bearing zones while a well is being drilled. Mud logging has been around since 1939 and first consisted of a basic gas sniffer. Over the years the a few more technologies have been added to mudlogging. One of those technologies, the gas chromatograph, was added sometimes during the 1950's. The chromatograph complimented the basic gas sniffer or gas detector as it is commonly referred to. The chromatograph allowed the mudlogger to not only know that he was getting gas while drilling through potentially productive zones, but it also allowed him to break the gas down into its component gases. The longer it took the sample of gas to come out of the chromatograph column, the heavier the gas was deemed to be. Methane came out first because it had fewer hydrogen and carbon atoms. Methane was considered a light gas. Then if heavier gases were present they came out next in order from lightest to heaviest. Ethane came out immediately after methane, then propane, iso-butane, and normal butane respectively. That basically meant that the mudlogger could determine by reading his instruments whether the gas he saw contained oil or if it primarily contained natural gas. If heavies, which was any gas heavier than methane was present then the mudlogger quickly began looking for other signs of oil such as fluorescence or oil visible on the mud pits.  As one could imagine the gas chromatograph was, and still is, a critical tool for determining if an oil bearing formation is being drilled through. 

The Problem With The Mudlogging Chromatograph 

As critical as the gas chromatograph is for gas analysis on a mudlogging unit, it isn't perfect. One of the main problems with a chromatograph is that it is too slow for modern drilling. Drilling technology has increased dramatically in the last few years. Wells are now being drilled faster and more efficiently than ever before. A typical mudlogging chromatograph takes five minute to analyze a sample of gas before it can take another sample. The possibility exists that entire oil bearing zones can be missed because the chromatograph was too slow to keep up with fast drilling.There are faster chromatographs, but with faster speeds, relability typically suffers and cost increases significantly. 

A Little Background On The Basic Mudlogging Gas Detector (It's Important)

The basic gas detector that was used in 1939 incorporated a hotwire sensor, also known as a catalytic combustion sensor, in conjunction with a Wheatstone Bridge circuit. A coiled platinum wire was heated until it glowed. Gas from the well was pumped over the platinum wire. The more gas that came into contact with the wire the hotter it got. Since the platinum wire changed its electrical resistance in direct proportion to its temperature the mud logger was able to output his results to a chart recorder, thus plotting a curve of the gas present. The detectors response to all of the various hydrocarbons was fairly linear in relation to on another. The hotwire detector is still being used in today's mudlogging units and is widely accepted as a good method of detecting gas.

Enter Infrared Gas Detectors

Recent breakthroughs in infrared gas detection sensors has made the infrared detector a popular choice for the modern mud logging unit. Modern infrared sensors are extremely stable and sensitive to even minute traces of gas. They are capable of detecting from 0% to 100% gas in air without additional calibration. They are an excellent choice for total gas detection on drilling rigs. The infrared detector, however, is not without its issues. One drawback of the infrared detector is that it is not particularly linear across the spectrum of hydrocarbon gases that it detects. For example, if the infrared detector is calibrated so that 100 units is equal to 1% methane in air it will read three times that many units when exposed to 1% propane in air. While it is still acceptable because we are only measuring relative quantities of gas, it is sometimes difficult to explain to our oil company bosses how we can read 300% gas in air during high gas situations.

 The Dual Sensor Gas Analyzer ( The low cost, high speed oil detector)

Here at Geospect Instruments, we have been building both hotwire and infrared mud logging gas detectors for many years. For years we were bombarded with requests for a faster more reliable chromatograph and also questions about higher than normal gas readings while drilling through heavies with an infrared detector. We finally realized that the answer to both issues was sitting right under our noses the whole time. We discovered that by placing a hotwire sensor and an infrared sensor in the same gas detector that we could detect heavy hydorcarbons in real time without even needing a chromatograph. Basically, we invented a low cost, high speed oil detector. We call our invention the Dual Sensor Gas Analyzer. We are very excited about our new mudlogging gadget and hope you will be too.



Mudlogging Chromatograph

2018-10-11 02:13:25

Geospect Geospect Chromatograph
Geospect Geospect Chromatograph
The Geospect continuous mud logging chromatograph detects methane through n-butane in under two and a half minutes. It fits neatly into the Geospect mudlogging system's case. The Geospect gas chromatograph uses the "packed column" method to break out hydrocarbons. The chromatograph also uses air as carrier its carrier gas.  First, gas from the well bore is pushed through the column with approximately five psi of air. When the gas exits the column it is runs across a catalytic bead sensor and produces peaks. The gases come out in the following order: methane, ethane, propane, iso-butane, and normal butane. The peaks are then analyzed by the Geospect software and recorded. The above described process continuously repeats itself.



Mud Logging Gas Detectors

2018-10-10 14:43:47

Geospect Mud Logging Gas Detectors
Geospect Mud Logging Gas Detectors

Mudlogging Gas Detectors

Geospect, LLC. is in the business of designing state-of-the-art gas detectors for the mud logging and drilling industries. Our gas detectors are fully computerized. The Geospect mudlogging software will display a continuous lag depth along with total gas readings that are produced by the Geospect Gas Detector.

Three Mudlogging Gas Detectors

Currently, Geospect Instruments manufactures three mudlogging gas detectors. The catalytic combustion detector, frequently referred to as the "Hotwire" gas detector, the Infrared mud logging gas detector, and our newest detector; The dual sensor gas analyzer.

The Catalytic Combustion Gas Detector

The Geospect Catalytic Combustion Gas detector (ML 18CC), commonly referred to as the "Hotwire" detector, uses a catalytic bead sensor that changes electrical resistance when exposed to hydrocarbons. The Geospect gas detection system then converts the electrical signals to digital data that are displayed in our software.

Infrared Gas Detector

The Geospect Catalytic Combustion Gas detector (ML 18IR) utilizes an infrared sensor that is tuned to the area of the infrared spectrum that is absorbed by hydrocarbons. Infrared sensors have a light source, a filter, and a sensor. The filter filters all of the light except for the infrared spectra in the hydrocarbon range. As hydrocarbon gas passes over the sensor some of the infrared light is absorbed. The sensor the detects the amount of light remaining after said absorption. The Geospect instrument then converts those differences in infrared light intensity to electrical signals, and finally to digital gas readings.

Dual Sensor Gas Analyzer

Over the years of developing mud logging gas detectors, we have discovered differences in the way that hotwire, and infrared detectors read gas. The most noticeable difference is when the hydrocarbon gas stream entering the detector contains only methane, or whether it also comprises heavier hydrocarbons like ethane, propane, butane, and pentane. The heavier gases cause both gas detectors to read higher than they would if exposed only to methane. The difference is that the hotwire detector reads only slighter higher when exposed to "heavies" whereas the infrared detector readings are much more pronounced when exposed to heavies. For example, when the IR detector is exposed to 1% by volume of propane it will read higher by a factor of three than it would if exposed to the same amount of methane. Therefore if the instrument is calibrated with 1% methane in air to read 100 units, it will read 300 units when exposed to 1% propane in air.

We at Geospect, after talking with some of our customers,  have discovered that if both sensors are included in the gas detector that the differences in the sensor readings can be used to determine is heavies are in the gas stream. This determination can be made in real time and independently of the mudlogging chromatograph. In 2018, drilling rates are becoming faster and faster. It is of great benefit to oil companies to know the exact depth at which the heavies occurred. This is sometimes impossible to do with a standard mudlogging chromatograph, because of analysis time. Most dependable mudlogging chromatographs only take a one second sample every five minutes. That resolution is not good enough for today's fast drilling environment.

The dual sensor gas analyzer should be included on every mud logging job so that the depth that heavies have occurred can be determined more precisely than ever before.






Mudlogging Software

2018-10-09 23:31:45

Geospect Mudlogging Software
Geospect Mudlogging Software

Geospect Mudlogging Software

Geospect software is the nerve center of the Geospect mudlogging system. Its menu driven screens are as powerful as they are user friendly. It is WITS compatible and is capable of both sending and receiving data to other WITS enabled computers across the wellsite.

  • DISPLAYS -It displays a rich, robust picture of critical mudlogging data in real time.

  • CALCULATES - It also does many mudlogging calculations in real time; such as lag, rate-of-penetration, and TVD.

  • LOGS - Geospect software logs all relevant mudlogging data into spreadsheet format; such as ROP, Lagged Gas, Chromatograph Readings, Co2 Data (if applicable), and TVD. Geospect can log data based on depth, time, or both. 

  • ALARMS - There are many alarms that are accessible through Geospect software. Alarms include both high and low settings for: ROP, Gas, SPM, etc. Alarms are both visible and audible.

  • WITS - Geospect software can receive and transmit data to other wellsite computers through the WITS protocol. You can transmit your gas to the rig's EDR system (Pason, Totco, etc). Geospect WITS also allows the mudlogger to receive certain sensor data from the EDR, allowing him/her to basically mudlog without hooking up sensors that are redundant to the EDR. In other words you don't have to hook up separate pump stroke counters, depth switches, or an on/off bottom switch

  • PULSE - Just because Geospect is capable of getting its data from WITS doesn't mean it has to. Geospect supports traditional sensors as well. Yes, you can still hook up micro-switches, donuts, depth wheels, pump stroke counters, on/off bottom switches, etc to Geospect.



Has Renting Mudlogging Equipment Got You Down

2018-10-09 12:34:01

Geospect Has Renting Mudlogging Equipment Got You Down
Geospect Has Renting Mudlogging Equipment Got You Down

Break Loose From The Mudlogging Equipment Rental Trap With Our New Financing Options

Renting Mudlogging Equipment Got You Down?

We understand why some folks feel trapped by the mudlogging equipment rental game. After paying those rental companies upwards of $3000 per month, per unit, there is that feeling of, “there has got to be a better way.” What if you owned your equipment outright? You could be putting all of that money into expanding your business or paying yourself more.

New Financing Options

We at Geospect have some great new financing options available that can help you own your equipment; In most cases for a much less per month cost. In fact, if you paid your regular rental fees as a per month payment, your equipment would be paid off in as little as seven months. Isn’t it time to do this for yourself and your company?

Volume Discounts
Ask about our volume discounts when purchasing three or more instruments. When we save money on the purchase of instrument hardware and components we like to pass that savings on to our customers.

Why owning a Geospect Mudlogging System is a good investment for your mudlogging company.

What is Geospect
Geospect is a complete mudlogging instrumentation package. It includes everything you need to analyze and detect gas. It has sensor inputs for depth, pump stroke counters, and on/off bottom status. It’s powerful software takes the sensor or WITS readings, analyze them, and display them, and saves them in real time with incredible accuracy.

WITS
In WITS mode, Geospect communicates with other computers around the location. Geospect seamlessly receives data and transmits gas readings to the rig EDR (eg. Pason). This saves the mudlogger time because data like depth and pump strokes are transmitted to Geospect automatically. This eliminates the chore of rigging up these sensors to Geospect separately.

The ability to transmit gas to other workstations around the location is becoming an important safety consideration to many oil companies.

Geospect Software

Geospect software is the best in the business. It takes sensor readings and WITS data and transforms that data into useful mudlogging information. It displays mudlogging information on rich, robust, graphs and charts. The software was among the first to display a Lag Depth right onscreen. This allows the mudlogger to have all of the data he/she needs organized in one place so when asked a question the mudlogger can respond instantly and with confidence.

Screenshot of Geospect Software

 

Features
Geospect software is packed with many useful features. Below is a very short list of what we believe are some of the most important ones.

  • EASY SETUP
  • DISPLAYS REAL-TIME CHARTS AND GRAPHS
  • CALCULATES AND DISPLAYS LAG DEPTH LOGS ALL PERTINENT MUDLOGGING DATA
  • IN SPREADSHEET FORMAT SEND GAS TO OTHER COMPUTERS ON LOCATION USING
  • WITS RECEIVE DEPTH AND PUMP STROKES FROM RIG EDR (PASON, TOTCO …ETC.)
  • HOOKS UP TO MOST MUDLOGGING SENSORS
  • CHOOSE FROM TWO TYPES OF GAS DETECTORS
  • ADD SOFTWARE TO 3RD PARTY GAS DETECTORS
  • ADD A CHROMATOGRAPH OR CO2 DETECTOR

How Owning a Geospect Mudlogging System Saves You Money
We sell our instruments rather than rent them. For this reason our customers can own their equipment outright and not have to pay continuously high rental prices. In most cases a Geospect customer will have their system paid for in as little as seven months by using the savings from not renting equipment from one of our competitors. Wouldn’t it be nice not to have those outrageous equipment rental bills?

How to Purchase a Geospect Mudlogging System
If you would like to purchase a new Geospect Mudlogging System, or simply have a few questions I invite you to call us. We are always ready to answer your questions and place orders. Also, you can visit our website at www.geospect.com. If you would like to request a quote click here. Finally, feel free to email me directly at mike@geospect.com.



NEW MUDLOGGING BUSINESS MODEL; AND THE OUTDATED MUDLOGGING TRAILER

2018-10-08 23:33:33

Geospect NEW MUDLOGGING BUSINESS MODEL; AND THE OUTDATED MUDLOGGING TRAILER
Geospect NEW MUDLOGGING BUSINESS MODEL; AND THE OUTDATED MUDLOGGING TRAILER

NEW MUDLOGGING BUSINESS MODEL;
AND THE OUTDATED MUDLOGGING TRAILER

Mudlogging Trailers
Mud logging trailers have been around since the 1930’s. They are small trailers, normally between 28’ and 32’ in length, and outfitted with both living quarters and a work area. They are hauled to a drilling location and rigged up just before “logging depth” is reached. The purpose of the mudlogging trailer and crew is to detect potential “zones of Interest” while drilling an oil or gas well. They also produce a geological and engineering record of said well.
Mudlogging Instruments of the Past
In the past it was necessary for mudlogging companies to outfit trailers with various instruments. These instruments were large and bulky and had various knobs, dials, and paper chart recorders. They also took up a lot of space and had to be permanently mounted onto rows of instrument racks inside of the mudlogging trailer.
Modern Mudlogging Instruments
Nowadays, with the advent of computers and sophisticated data acquisition software, mudlogging instrumentation has shrunk, in size, considerably (See Geospect.com). Modern mudlogging instruments are portable and can be carried around in the trunk of the mudlogger’s car and moved, with ease, from jobsite to jobsite if necessary. The modernization of mudlogging instrumentation begs the question, “Is the mudlogging company owned trailer the best, most cost effective way to house a modern mudlogging operation?”
Mudlogging Trailers Take a Beating
One of the biggest expense that a mudlogging company faces is maintaining a fleet of mudlogging trailers. Mudlogging trailers take a beating. Oilfield roads are extremely rough on a mudlogging trailer. Many times they are dragged into a location, through the mud, by a bulldozer because a truck would get stuck trying to pull them. They are also occasionally moved around with forklifts. This is evidenced by the fork holes found in many mudlogging trailers.
Mudlogging Trailer Fleets are Expensive to Maintain
Mudlogging Trailer Fleets are Expensive to Maintain. Any owner of a mudlogging company can attest to this. Extensive repairs are often required after a job. Tires need to be replaced. Hot water heaters go out, Air Conditioners need servicing, plumbing needs to be fixed, power cables get ran over, etc. This doesn’t include service calls for things that need to be repaired during the course of drilling a well. There are usually one or more full time employees dedicated to maintaining the trailers.
Companies Specialize in Providing Oilfield Housing
Almost all services that require housing on a modern drilling location, use housing that is rented by the oil company. The exception to this is mudlogging trailers. There are companies that specialize in providing housing to drilling locations. These companies are usually very good at what they do. They provide the housing at a reasonable rates. The quality of the rentals are much better that most mudlogging companies can afford. The living areas are also larger and more comfortable and they also meet safety standards set in place by OSHA, other agencies, as well as those adopted by oilfield insurance companies.
Which Setup Would Be Optimal for A Mudlogging Operation?
A typical setup that would be ideal for a mudlogging trailer would be one that is similar to a mud engineer’s trailer. Just make sure there is adequate sleeping arrangements for two people rather than one. This should be an easy modification for the housing rental company. There is an office/lab area on one end, and the rest of the trailer is dedicated to living space. Most mud engineer’s trailers are approximately 40’ in length and are readily available in most areas where drilling occurs.
Benefits to the Oil Company
There are many benefits that an oil company would enjoy when renting the housing for the mudlogging company. The most obvious benefit should be an immediate reduction in the mudlogging company’s day rate. Also, the dreaded cost of transporting the unit would be eliminated and would offset the transportation cost of transporting the rental trailer. Besides cost, there are also intangible benefits to having the oil company provide a trailer. Below is a list of benefits that an oil company should consider when trying to decide whether to go the traditional route or to rent the housing for the mudlogging operation.
  -Cost. The mudlogging company should be able to lower its cost substantially when the oil company provides the housing.
  -Assurance of newer type instruments. Mudlogging companies that can move into a company supplied trailer by default, have to be using the newer style instruments, because they are the only ones that are portable enough to be moved into those trailers.
  -The unit will normally be newer and much more presentable when investors arrive on location to see the mud logs.
  -Mudlogger moral. Have you ever had a good mud logger that you really liked and he or she quit the job in the middle of the well? Consider how much more comfortable the mudlogger’s living arrangements will be in the newer, larger, more modern trailer. Mudlogger moral should change considerably when they are afforded the same type accommodations as other oilfield professionals on location.
  -The oil company will be assured that all OSHA safety regulations are strictly followed by the housing rental company, thus reducing the oil company’s exposure in such matters.
  -Mudlogging companies can travel greater distances, more economically, when not burdened with hauling a trailer to a remote location, or maintaining a trailer once it gets there.
Benefits to the Mudlogging Company
Many of the same benefits the oil companies would enjoy with the arrangement of them providing housing to the mudlogging company would also be enjoyed by the mudlogging company. That is if the mudlogging company uses modern instruments that are not dependent upon having a trailer. Mudlogging companies could also benefit from:
- A more professional looking setup
  -Happier employees with less employee turnover
  -Assurance that safety rules and regulation, both publically and privately imposed are followed with regards to employee housing.
  -Having the ability to branch out further geographically
  -Less (or no) time and resources devoted to trailer maintenance and repairs.
  -Fewer support related employees maintaining old trailers.
  -Ability to quickly mobilize and manage more mudlogging jobs simultaneously
  -Can give customers discounts without decreasing profit margins thereby becoming extremely competitive in the mudlogging field.
Business Model Not Entirely Novel Idea
The business model outlined in this paper is not an entirely new idea. A variation of it is commonly used when drilling in the Bakkin play in North Dakota. The reasons it is being done there are because of the rapid expansion in drilling in the area a few years ago combined with the extreme temperatures in the region. The oil company rents a “command center” to house both the MWD and mudlogging companies operations. The crews sleep in separate quarters. The arrangement seems to work very well.
Conclusion
If oil companies would begin renting housing for mudlogging companies to use instead of mudlogging companies providing the trailers it would be beneficial to all involved; the oil companies themselves, the mudlogging companies, and the mudlogging company field employees.
GEOSPECT MUDLOGGING INTERESTED IN WORKING WITH OIL COMPANIES USING THE ABOVE BUSINESS MODEL
Geospect Mudlogging is especially interested in working with oil companies that would like to try this mudlogging business model. We believe the business model presented above will be the future in mudlogging. We also believe it to be more cost effective and efficient. This model WILL save the oil company money and result in all around better service. Our other company, Geospect Instruments (See www.geospect.com) also manufactures the type of instruments that would accommodate such a mudlogging operation. Additionally, we can put you in touch with our
many customers around the country who have purchased instruments from us, thereby assuring you that we can help you with your mudlogging needs anywhere within the United States.

Please feel free to call Geospect at 409.771.3574



Tips for getting a mudlogging unit ready for a new job

2018-10-08 23:21:20

Geospect Tips for getting a mudlogging unit ready for a new job
Drilling rig in remote location

When preparing a mud logging unit for the field it is important to make sure it is fully stocked and in working condition. Here are a few tips to remember:

LEAVE NOTHING BEHIND

Make an inventory checklist for everything that must go in your mudlogging unit. Have whoever is stocking the unit initial by each item when it is placed on the unit. This is very important because if something is left behind an extra trip might have to be made to take something out to the location which could be hundreds of miles away from the shop. It is also a good idea to have the unit manager initial that the items were received out in the field.

TEST EVERYTHING

Make a checklist of all of the equipment that is leaving out to make sure it is in good working order. Have the technician initial by each piece of equipment that it was working properly when checked.

CHECK TRAILER

Make a checklist of everything on the trailer and make sure it is safe and legal to be on the road.

FOOD FOR RIG UP

Rig up day can be frustrating for some mudloggers. Sometimes they drive for hours to get to a muddy location. After arriving they sometimes must immediately rig up. This often leaves no time for grocery shopping. It is also better to go grocery shopping after rigging up because then the refrigerator is on and working at that time. Stocking the unit with canned food and snacks for rig up day often makes things run a lot smoother.

Following these simple tips can save time, money, and aggravation.

(C)Copyright Geospect Instruments

www.geospect.com

Call Geospect about all of your mudlogging and mudlogging equipment needs. 409.771.3574



Mudlogging

2018-10-08 23:15:10

Geospect Mudlogging
Geospect Mudlogging Trailer

Mudlogging

Geospect owner Mike Cunningham, Jr. has been mudlogging since he was 10 years old. Mike would help out at his father’s mudlogging company after school and during summer vacations, “catching samples” and learning about the business. By the time he was 19, Mike was in operations at a large mudlogging company. By 1998, he had started his own mudlogging company, Camco Logging Service.

The surprising thing about Mike’s experience is not how long he’s been in the mudlogging business, but how little the business has changed since he first became a part of it. Very little seems to have changed in logging during the past 30 years. While other industries have been revolutionized by the computer age, mudlogging has remained mired in the past.

When Mike Cunningham opened Camco for business fifteen years ago, he envisioned a company that did things a little differently. Rather than using a hodgepodge of outdated equipment prone to frequent breakdowns, Mike envisioned a new type of instrumentation system. This system would be compact, accurate and easy to use.

Even better, this system would be reliable, resulting in a dramatic reduction of downtime. Mike and the folks at Camco developed the Geospect Instrument over the course of five years. Years of field testing have resulted in the best mudlogging instrumentation system in the world, the Geospect. Through Camco, clients like Anadarko Petroleum, Kerr McGee, and Clayton Williams Energy have greatly benefited from Geospect’s superior performance. If you own a mudlogging company of your own, contact Geospect to find out how Geospect can benefit your clients. Contact us at (409) 771-3574, and we’ll be glad to talk with you about it.



Mudlogging Equipment

2018-10-08 23:13:12

Geospect Geospect Mudlogging Equipment
Geospect Geospect Mudlogging Equipment

Geospect Mudlogging Equipment

The Geospect Mudlogging System is a complete mudlogging instrumentation package. It includes everything you need to analyze and detect gas. Geospect comes with your choice of an infrared or hotwire gas sensor. The geospect chromatograph automatically analyzes the gases that come out of the well bore. It has sensor inputs for depth, pump stroke counters, and on/off bottom status. It’s powerful software takes the sensor, or WITS, readings, analyze them, and display them, and saves them in real time with incredible accuracy.


CALL US ANYTIME AT 409-771-3574

 


Geospect connected in dual screen configuration

Geospect Software

Geospect software is the best in the business. It takes sensor readings and WITS data and transforms that data into useful mudlogging information. It displays mudlogging information on rich, robust, graphs and charts. The software was among the first to display a Lag Depth right onscreen. This allows the mudlogger to have all of the data he/she needs organized in one place so when asked a question the mudlogger can respond instantly and with confidence.


Mudlogging System Features

Geospect has many features that were especially designed for the mudlogging professional. Our instruments were designed with you in mind. The folks who designed Geospect have been involved in mudlogging for going on three generations.

  • EASY SETUP
  • DISPLAYS REAL-TIME CHARTS AND GRAPHS
  • CALCULATES AND DISPLAYS LAG DEPTH
  • LOGS ALL PERTINENT MUDLOGGING DATA IN SPREADSHEET FORMAT
  • SEND GAS TO OTHER COMPUTERS ON LOCATION USING WITS
  • RECEIVE DEPTH AND PUMP STROKES FROM RIG EDR (PASON, TOTCO …ETC.)
  • HOOKS UP TO MOST MUDLOGGING SENSORS
  • CHOOSE FROM TWO TYPES OF GAS DETECTORS
  • ADD SOFTWARE TO 3RD PARTY GAS DETECTORS
  • ADD A CHROMATOGRAPH OR CO2 DETECTOR

 

WITS

In WITS mode, Geospect communicates with other computers around the location. Geospect seamlessly receives data and transmits gas readings to the rig EDR (eg. Pason). This saves the mudlogger time because data like depth and pump strokes are transmitted to Geospect automatically. This eliminates the chore of rigging up these sensors to Geospect separately.

The ability to transmit gas to other workstations around the location is becoming an important safety consideration to many oil companies.


Geospect has a built-in terminal program that lets you see a live WITS feed with a click of a button.

NEW Geospect Live

Geospect Live lets you broadcast information about your well in real time over the Internet. You get to choose which wells are broadcast and who gets to view them. Your customers can get a quick status update from their computer, smartphone, tablet, or other devices.


Geospect Live Broadcasts Live Data over the Internet

Geospect Dual Sensor Gas Analyzer

Our Dual Sensor Gas Analyzer (DSGA) is capable of detecting the presents of heavy hydrocarbons in the gas stream at the same resolution as the total gas detector. You and your clients will know the exact depth that heavies were encountered.



CALL US ANYTIME AT 409-771-3574

How Owning a Geospect Mudlogging System Saves You Money

We sell our instruments rather than rent them. For this reason our customers can own their equipment outright and not have to pay continuously high rental prices. In most cases a Geospect customer will have their system paid for in as little as seven months by using the savings from not renting equipment from one of our competitors. Wouldn’t it be nice not to have those outrageous equipment rental bills?

How much does it cost to rent a mudlogging system from a mudlogging equipment rental company?

Renting mudlogging equipment is expensive. In some cases, if you were to purchase a new Geospect system and put your normal rental payments toward it, it would be paid off in less than six months. After that, you can put that rental money in your pocket where it belongs.


1 month
6 months
1 year
2 years
5 years
1 unit
$3000 $18,000 $36,000 $72,000 $180,000
5 units
$15,000 $90,000 $180,000 $360,000 $900,000
10 units $30,000 $180,000 $360,000 $720,000 $1,800,000
20 units $60,000 $360,000 $720,000 $1,440,000 $3,600,000

The above table shows how much it cost to rent a mudlogging system over time. We assume a rental price of $3000 per month.

Bulk Discounts

When you purchase three or more Geospect Mudlogging Systems you qualify a bulk discount.

 

Purchase a New Geospect Mudlogging System Now

If you would like to purchase a new Geospect Mudlogging System, or simply have a few questions I invite you to call us. We are always ready to answer your questions and place orders. Also, you can visit our website at www.geospect.com. If you would like to request a quote click here.

REQUEST A QUOTE NOW!

 

Financing Options

We have some exciting new financing options that can be tailored to your needs. Please call us to discuss them. Contact us.

CALL US ANYTIME AT 409-771-3574



Mudlogging Gas Detectors

2018-10-08 23:11:24

Geospect Geospect Mudlogging Gas Detectors
Geospect Geospect Mudlogging Gas Detectors

Geospect mudlogging gas detectors have been used in the oilfield by mudloggers since 2001. We began with a single model that used a catalytic bead sensor with a wheatstone bridge circuit connected to data acquisition software. We were also among the first mudlogging instrument manufacturing companies to eliminate the paper chart recorder and replace it with graphical displays on a computer screen.

Infrared Detector

We began offering our customers a choice of either using an infrared gas sensor or a catalytic bead sensor in their gas detectors around 2005. Since that time infrared sensor technology has improved. Our current  infrared gas detector will read up to 100% gas and is extremely sensitive for low levels of gas as well. The infrared gas detector is also not flow sensitive like the catalytic bead sensor, drift is almost non-existent, and it holds an extremely stable baseline. It is because of these improvements that most of our customers prefer the infrared option.

Catalytic Bead Sensor

Some of our customers still prefer the catalytic bead sensor in their gas detectors. This is mainly due to the bead sensor’s sensitivity to acetylene. Acetylene is the gas that is produced by dropping a carbide bomb down the drill string. This practice has been used for decades in the mudlogging industry to determine lag time.

Geospect Best Anywhere

Whether our customers choose a catalytic bead style mudlogging gas detector, or go for the infrared option, they can be confident that they are purchasing the best mudlogging gas detectors available anywhere.

How to Purchase

If you are interested in purchasing a Geospect gas detector please give us a call at 409.925.1274 or email us at: info@geospect.com. You may also request a quote by visiting our website at: geospect.com/quote.



Geospect Multi-Unit Discounts

2018-10-08 23:10:19

Geospect Geospect Multi-Unit Discounts
Geospect Geospect Multi-Unit Discounts
Don’t forget to ask about our multi-unit discounts when purchasing three or more Geospect Mudlogging Systems.



Mudlogging without a Pulse Box

2018-10-08 23:09:07

Geospect Mudlogging without a Pulse Box
Geospect Mudlogging without a Pulse Box

As many of you know, Pason is phasing out its support for its pulse box. The pulse box is a device that takes a WITS Level 0 feed and converts it into electrical pulses. This allows the mud logger’s equipment to count feet, count pump strokes, and detect on/off bottom status.

The Problem

Many mudlogging companies are still using older equipment and are not equipped to operate properly without a pulse box because there is no way to count feet. At one time mudloggers could connect a microswitch to the rig geolograph to count feet, however most rigs these days do not use a geolograph.

The Solution

Any Windows computer running Geospect software can hook up to an EDR workstation like Pason, through a serial port, to receive a WITS transmission. Geospect software will then count feet, count pump strokes, lag gas, and much more. Contact us for more information.



Press Release and Description of the Geospect Dual Sensor Gas Analyzer

2018-10-08 23:06:45

Geospect Press Release and Description of the Geospect Dual Sensor Gas Analyzer
Geospect Press Release and Description of the Geospect Dual Sensor Gas Analyzer

Description of the Dual Sensor Gas Analyzer

Here’s a link to a press release that we sent out just after we started marketing our new patent pending Geospect Dual Sensor Gas Analyzer (DSGA). The DSGA monitors the gas coming out of an oil or gas well for the presents of heavy hydrocarbons in real time without a mudlogging chromatograph. It accomplishes this by using an infrared sensor in conjunction with a catalytic combustion sensor and comparing their results. An infrared sensor is notorious for giving much higher readings for heavy hydrocarbons than it does for methane. A catalytic combustion sensor, while not giving entirely linear readings across the hydrocarbon spectrum, is much better at it than the infrared sensor. By combining the two sensors in the same instrument, calibrating them both with methane, and comparing their outputs, one can easily see when heavy hydrocarbons are present in the gas stream as it is sampled from the well bore. The DSGA was originally intended to be used in mud logging, however other uses for it, such as pipeline leak detection are readily apparent.

Features of the DSGA

  • Catalytic combustion sensor and Infrared Sensor in the same Instrument
  • Compares the results of above sensors
  • Determines if heavy hydrocarbons are present
  • Determines the amount of heavy hydrocarbons in relation to methane



HOW TO SELL MUDLOGGING SERVICES TO OIL COMPANIES

2018-10-08 23:04:44

Geospect HOW TO SELL MUDLOGGING SERVICES TO OIL COMPANIES
Geospect HOW TO SELL MUDLOGGING SERVICES TO OIL COMPANIES

SELLING MUDLOGGING SERVICES TO OIL COMPANIES

Because I have been around mud logging most of my life and have owned Camco Logging Service, I get asked quite a bit about how to go about the business of selling mudlogging contracts to oil companies. This is especially true because I now own Geospect Instruments and talk to other owners of mudlogging companies, some big and some small on a daily basis. I am going to try to explain the way I go about doing it in this short article. Of course, I’m going to hit the high points here because I’m sure I could probably end up with a book if I went into enough detail. So let’s get started.

HAVE SOME SALES MATERIAL ABOUT YOUR MUDLOGGING SERVICES COMPANY AVAILABLE BEFORE YOU GET STARTED

You should have some sales material available and make it look professional. Make sure the spelling and grammar are correct and that your material is well organized. I made up a small booklet was professionally bound for my sales presentation. I also used very good paper for this. Also, you will need business cards. Because of the fact that you are selling your product to oil company geologists who typically have a master’s degree or above, I would suggest a good quality business card and other sales material.

WHO TO SELL TO?

First things first, you should subscribe to a service that sends out daily well permits for the area that you are interested in doing mudlogging work. These permits will give you a general idea of where to start. I would not waste any time trying to sell mudlogging jobs for wells that are being drilled shallower than 10,000 feet. This is because it is just as easy to focus your efforts on wells that will pay you the most money. Of course, you can bid on jobs that will come up that are below 10k feet, but concentrate your sales efforts on the higher paying jobs. This being said, almost all of the wells that have been permitted that are using mudlogging services have already contracted with a mudlogging company. Most of the companies that are permitting wells today will be permitting wells in the future so drilling permits offer a wealth of information to you about your future potential clients.

OK, I HAVE MY DRILLING PERMITS, NOW WHAT DO I DO?

Record Information

After you get the permits you should start some kind of file. Index cards work great, but you can use a computer Customer Relations Management program (CRM) if you like. I have found that some CRM programs do nothing but eat up your time trying to learn them. Unless you are already very familiar with one, I’d steer clear of them at least at first. Use the index cards to record any information you find out when calling on oil companies. This information can be name of the geologist, phone numbers, emails, when they will begin new projects, etc. In the mudlogging sales game information is crucial. The more you have the better.

Cold Calling

Now start calling the oil companies and ask whoever answers direct you to the geologist in charge of the “sample well #1” or whatever well is on the permit. Sometimes it is extremely difficult to get to talk to the geologist on the first call, however, at least try to get his name, email, mailing address, or whatever information you can get about contacting him or her in the future. Also note his secretary’s name if that’s who you get to talk to. Ask that person if it’s OK to mail him some information about your company to get the mailing address.

I FINALLY GOT THROUGH TO THE GEOLOGIST, WHAT DO I SAY?

Never try to sell a geologist a mudlogging job on the phone. You need a face to face appointment. Ask him if you can stop by his office to discuss mudlogging with him. Petroleum geologists are very busy people so their time is at a premium. Tell them you will only take five minutes of their time and mean it. When you do get an appointment make sure you remember this. It also helps if you have a date and time in mind so that you can quickly make an appointment and get off of the phone. When you make an appointment to see the geologist GET OFF OF THE PHONE! Your job as far as the phone call is concerned is done. While on the phone always remember, sell the appointment not the job. Once you have secured the appointment, nothing good can come from a continued phone conversation. Be polite. Say thank you for the appointment, look forward to meeting with you and goodbye. You always want to take a two-step approach to selling mudlogging jobs. Step 1 is selling the appointment Step 2 is selling the Job.

WHAT TO EXPECT AT YOUR SALES APPOINTMENT

Always show up and be in the lobby at least 15 minutes ahead of your meeting time. Be well dressed. I would suggest a coat and tie, although a very successful colleague of mine always wears slacks with no tie and never forgets to tell me that I should too. Nevertheless, dress sharp. You should have a good pen, a watch and be dressed in professional attire. I know and you know that you’ll probably be knee deep in mud on location the next day but today you are a businessman so dress and look the part. Make sure you are nice to the secretary or receptionist. They can make or break you in many cases. Sometimes, while in the lobby you may find some company literature. Check and see if you can glean any useful information out of that. Normally, the geologist will meet you in the lobby and take you back to his office or a conference room. Sometimes there will be other geologists present for the meeting. When that happens it is usually a good thing because the other geologists will probably be in charge of other prospects and may be interested in your services as well. After everyone is sitting down and introductions are made exchange business cards. Now ask if it is ok if you get started. Give a quick presentation of the mudlogging services you offer. If he interrupts or starts talking let him. Just listen. Pay careful attention to the time. You promised five minutes. He may ask you to stay longer but remind him when your five minutes is up. Make sure you ask about his upcoming projects and ask for the work. When it is time to leave Look at him in the eye, smile, tell him it was nice to meet him and that you hope to do business with him in the future.

FOLLOW UP

Within 24 hours send a follow-up letter (snail mail) thanking him for the appointment and that you hope to do business with him soon. About every month or so send another sales letter and call to touch base with him about any upcoming projects he may be working on.

APPOINTMENTS

You should try to line up no more than four appointments per day in the same city. Two before lunch and two after. If you can get a chance to take a geologist to lunch, even better. Everyone loves a free meal including petroleum geologists. Just remember no more than four per day.

PERSISTENCE AND NUMBERS

Repeat the above process as many times as practical and you’ll do great.

OUT OF AREA OIL COMPANIES

If you live Texas and want for your mudlogging jobs to be in Texas, don’t overlook the companies that are based in Oklahoma City, Tulsa, and Denver. They often drill down in Texas but are neglected by mudlogging company salesmen because of the location of their offices. It may be well worth your trip to pay them a visit.

I hope this helps you in your quest to sell your mud logging services.

 



Mudlogging Jobs and Employment

2018-10-08 22:59:32

Geospect Mudlogging Jobs and Employment
Geospect Mudlogging Jobs and Employment

Mudlogging Jobs

Because we manufacture mudlogging instrumentation, we are constantly on the phone with the good folks that own or manage mudlogging companies. We are always giving advice about equipment and other, more general, things pertaining to the mud logging business. One of the biggest questions that I am asked is that if I know where to find good mudloggers. When I was running Camco Logging Service, I had a form online that mud loggers could complete and that was where I found most of my hands. In fact, I found so many that I would hook them up with my Geospect customers quite regularly. Since I shut down the Camco website, I have lost contact with many mudloggers and I haven’t been able to do that as much. That being said, I can usually find a place for a mudlogger to go to work if they are experienced. For this reason, and the fact that I have been thinking about getting back into the mud logging business myself,  I have recently put an employment form on the Geospect website. Because we sell instruments all over the United States, we can usually place a mudlogger with a mudlogging company almost anywhere.

Things to Consider Before Filling Out Our Mudlogging Jobs Form

The following things go without saying but I’m just going to put them out there:

  • Our clients are looking for experienced mudloggers – We would expect that you have some mudlogging experience before you call yourself a mudlogger. That being said, the industry as a whole could use some more good mud loggers. If you do not have experience and would like to break into the field of mud logging, I would suggest contacting a company that has an offshore division. Most offshore mudlogging operations use sample catchers to help the mudloggers because the workload is heavier offshore. A sample catcher usually doesn’t need mudlogging experience and it is a great way to learn from the mudlogger that you will be working with. By starting out as a sample catcher and working hard, you should be a mud logger in no time at all.
  • Please tell us as much as possible about your mudlogging experience, skills, and abilities
  • Please indicate the areas you are willing to work
  • Please indicate the areas in which you have experience
  • Having worked with Geospect equipment isn’t necessary but it is a plus so please indicate it on the form.
  • Most of our mudlogging company clients drug test potential employees

With all of that being said, we would love to hear from you

Our clients are always looking for qualified mudloggers and we would love to pass your name along to them. 



New Mudlogging Technology that Works

2018-10-08 22:56:23

Geospect New Mudlogging Technology that Works
Geospect New Mudlogging Technology that Works

An Explanation of the Capabilities of the Geospect Dual-Sensor-Gas Analyzer

We released our patent-pending dual sensor gas analyzer (DSGA) a few months ago. I’m still not convinced that I did a very good job of explaining how it works, its ease of use, and benefits of having one on every mud logging unit. Given the current state of the oilfield, I could never forgive myself I didn’t provide my customers with every possible advantage available to them while they are trying so hard to secure their mud logging contracts. Having the DSGA is a tremendous benefit to both the mud logger and their oil company client. It can locate oil shows that can easily be overlooked by using a mud logging chromatograph alone.

THE GEOSPECT DUAL SENSOR GAS ANALYZER

The Dual-Sensor-Gas Analyzer (DSGA) by Geospect is the latest gadget in mudlogging technology. Instead of breaking gas down into component gases like a chromatograph, it only “sees” two gases. The two gases that the DSGA sees are METHANE and HEAVIES. By heavies I mean the combined hydrocarbon gases that are heavier than methane and are present in the continuous gas stream that enters the analyzer.

HOW DOES THE DSGA KNOW WHEN IT IS DETECTING HEAVIES

Both a catalytic bead sensor and an infrared sensor is installed inside of the Geospect mudlogging system. Both sensors are then calibrated to read the same amount of gas units when exposed to methane gas. The DSGA then continuously compare the outputs of both sensors. When methane only appears in the gas stream, both curves track closely with one another. When the infrared sensor gives a greater response to gas than that of the CC sensor, heavy hydrocarbons are indicated. It works like this because an infrared hydrocarbon sensor gives a greater response to heavies than it does to methane (See Figure 1). This hypersensitive response to heavy hydrocarbons by the infrared sensor allows us to determine that heavies are present by simply comparing the outputs of the two sensors.

(Figure 1) Graph showing just how much more sensitive an Infrared sensor is to heavy hydrocarbons than it is to methane. Compare the IR sensor to the Catalytic Bead Sensor (Pellistor) and you have an Instant – real-time determination of heavies being present in the gas stream. The DSGA also outputs a ratio of the IR sensor to the CC sensor. Anything greater than one (1) is an indication of heavies. As the ratio increases, so does the amount of heavies .

The Dual-Sensor Gas Analyzer (DGSA) by Geospect is better at detecting heavies in the field than a chromatograph. I say this because of the following reasons. It is simple to use. It gives extremely reliable and repeatable results, and the real-time resolution aspect of the DSGA is outstanding.

EASE OF USE IN THE FIELD

It is simple to use and accurate. It’s relative easy for the field technician to determine the presents of heavies which gives the mud logger confidence in his equipment and his ability to quickly and accurately ascertain the EXACT depth in which they were encountered.

Dual Sensor Gas Analyzer Software

CONTINUOUS REAL-TIME RESOLUTION WITH RESPECT TO DEPTH

In contrast to a mudlogging chromatograph, the DSGA continuously analyzes samples in real-time; alerting the mudlogger the instant heavies are encountered. Most mudlogging chromatographs take a five second sample of gas once every five minutes or so. During fast drilling, the resolution of a typical mudlogging chromatograph leaves much to be desired. The potential exists for a chromatograph to miss entire pay zones because of this. Also given the complexity of some chromatographs, the potential human error exists.

GEOSPECT CHROMATOGRAPH COMBINED WITH DSGA

The Geospect mud logging system can easily accommodate both a chromatograph and the DSGA. There’s nothing that says you can’t have them both. By combining the two tools, you can get an accurate measurement of the hydrocarbon composition of the gas, as well as, very good resolution. There is also the peace of mind of knowing you are not going to miss a show.









Welcome

Welcome to the all new Geospect website. Thanks for visiting. We hope this site will serve you well.

Recent Articles

----- Get All Articles